Wednesday, October 11, 2006

Learning With Games, Learning by Making Games

The October issue of the e-journal, ITALICS is dedicated to Learning with Games. The article titles include:

Innovations in Learning and Teaching Approaches using Game Technologies – Can “The Movies” teach how to make a movie?

A Crisis in Physics Education : Games to the Rescue!

Introducing Game Development into the Computing Curriculum – A Progressive Methodology

Providing the skills required for innovative mobile game development using industry/academic partnerships

Using A Virtual World For Transferable Skills in Gaming Education

2 comments:

Pattie said...

Technology has to a large degree changed the definition of a library. No longer is a library seen as simply a physical building housing a variety of resources for its patrons. A library can literally exist only in cyberspace, assessable to literally millions of users worldwide, yet have no physical address. Does this mean that actual library buildings will no longer exist in the future? Absolutely not, it simply means that the delivery of resources, services, and customer service must change to match the needs of the public. It also means that attitudes toward particular resources such as online games must be reevaluated in the library setting. While once gaming was considered mindless-useless tools used by uneducated youth that is no longer the case. Many of the games are sophisticated, technically designed, and graphically appealing to all age groups. Their popularity and growth over the last ten years has been colossal to say the least. Many of these games require a great deal of skill, thought and interaction on the part of the user, and are being used as tools to entice all age groups to come into the library. How profound! The Metropolitan Library System has created a blog dedicated to using gaming resources in the library. (http://gaminginlibraries.org/) This site encourages libraries to use gaming of all types in the library, as well as posting comments on the website as to its effectiveness or lack thereof. The responses from libraries all over the country are astounding. There are even online games designed for older citizens that are very successful. I read an article about a game called Counterpoint 1.1 which is an online game that plays a variety of tunes and the players must guess what the tunes are. I think this game could be a wonderful resource for bringing older patrons into the library. (http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/22648) Older patrons love to remember the “golden years”. Why not use this game to help older patrons remember the classic hits of yesterday? Or the game could be used to help teens or adults experience the variety of music that has evolved over the years. This possibility of this game and many others is endless as to their use in the library. Some libraries are hosting gaming tournaments, and the number of attendees is growing at an alarming rate. I think as librarians we need to “think outside the box” and realize that library services are changing, but this doesn’t mean we will someday be out of a job -- just the contrary is true. The role of the librarian is changing, but I view the changes as exciting. Helping patrons and getting them excited about knowledge has been and always will be the central role of the librarian. Our methods are just changing.

Pattie said...

Technology has to a large degree changed the definition of a library. No longer is a library seen as simply a physical building housing a variety of resources for its patrons. A library can literally exist only in cyberspace, assessable to literally millions of users worldwide, yet have no physical address. Does this mean that actual library buildings will no longer exist in the future? Absolutely not, it simply means that the delivery of resources, services, and customer service must change to match the needs of the public. It also means that attitudes toward particular resources such as online games must be reevaluated in the library setting. While once gaming was considered mindless-useless tools used by uneducated youth that is no longer the case. Many of the games are sophisticated, technically designed, and graphically appealing to all age groups. Their popularity and growth over the last ten years has been colossal to say the least. Many of these games require a great deal of skill, thought and interaction on the part of the user, and are being used as tools to entice all age groups to come into the library. How profound! The Metropolitan Library System has created a blog dedicated to using gaming resources in the library. (http://gaminginlibraries.org/) This site encourages libraries to use gaming of all types in the library, as well as posting comments on the website as to its effectiveness or lack thereof. The responses from libraries all over the country are astounding. There are even online games designed for older citizens that are very successful. I read an article about a game called Counterpoint 1.1 which is an online game that plays a variety of tunes and the players must guess what the tunes are. I think this game could be a wonderful resource for bringing older patrons into the library. (http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/22648) Older patrons love to remember the “golden years”. Why not use this game to help older patrons remember the classic hits of yesterday? Or the game could be used to help teens or adults experience the variety of music that has evolved over the years. This possibility of this game and many others is endless as to their use in the library. Some libraries are hosting gaming tournaments, and the number of attendees is growing at an alarming rate. I think as librarians we need to “think outside the box” and realize that library services are changing, but this doesn’t mean we will someday be out of a job -- just the contrary is true. The role of the librarian is changing, but I view the changes as exciting. Helping patrons and getting them excited about knowledge has been and always will be the central role of the librarian. Our methods are just changing.